1. Moving up the Alaska Highway

    July 15, 2014 by Brian Smith

    If you are thinking about moving to Alaska, here’s a taste of the beauty of Alaska that will surround you as seen by one of our trustworthy Alaska drivers carefully making his way to deliver shipments moving to Anchorage and moving to Fairbanks.


  2. Even An Ancient King Moved to Alaska!

    October 17, 2013 by Brian Smith

    The world-renowned King Tut has been traveling around the world making stops so that peoples of many different countries and cultures might have a chance to get to know him.  Officially, he is referred to as Tutankhamun, King and Pharaoh of Ancient Egypt, who ruled during the 18th Dynasty (1332 BC to 1323 BC) for nine years.  So he’s a pretty old fella!  His most recent stop was at Anchorage for the Alaska State Fair in August and September for 12 days.  Being that he’s from a little warmer climate than Alaska provides and when it was time to move on, he chose Hi-Line Moving Services to get him back to his home in the city of Cairo, Egypt.

    So there you have it, folks!  Even kings and pharaohs know the best deal when it comes to moving to or from Alaska and quite literally just about anywhere in the world.

    When you’re ready to make your move to Alaska or from Alaska, be sure to call Hi-Line Moving Services.  We’ll treat YOU like a king!  If you don’t believe us, just ask King Tut.  He knows that Hi-Line Moving Services took really good care of him!


  3. Breaking Ice in Alaska?

    May 3, 2013 by Brian Smith

    In the northernmost parts of our country, this time of the year is often referred to as the “spring thaw”.  There is also talk about ice breakers clearing passageways on the waterways way, way up north in Alaska.  Well, here at Hi-line Moving Services where you can find us regularly moving good people and their possessions, a large contingency of our staff and crew took part in an Ice Breaker of our own.  We are headquartered in beautiful Great Falls, Montana – right at the beginning of the ALCAN Highway where the journey for those moving to or from Alaska will pass.  Every year, our fair city celebrates the coming of spring with the running of the Ice Breaker Road Race.  We extend a hearty congratulations to the 18 members of our staff and crew that participated in this year’s 34th annual running of the Ice Breaker.  They are:

    • Calvin Gilbert
    • Patrick Broadhurst
    • William Broadhurst
    • Deanna Fleming
    • Brittney Sack
    • Bill Young
    • Elise Halloran
    • Debi Davis
    • Bernadette Parisian
    • Jose Cuntapay
    • Kathy Dixon
    • Betty Kraft
    • Nancy Flannery
    • Linda Vilcek
    • Connie Van De Bogart
    • Bob Davis
    • Jeff Krantwashl
    • Jeff Krantwashl, Jr.


  4. International Recognition for Alaska Moving Company

    April 4, 2012 by Brian Smith

    The Portal is the industry trade journal of the International Association of Movers.  Hi-Line Moving Services, an Alaska mover offering moving services to those wishing to move to Alaska or from Alaska, was recently featured in the lead article of the March/April 2012 edition.  What caught their interest was the unique way that Hi-Line Moving Services advertises to the Alaska specialty market that they are continually working on developing.

    Hi-Line Moving Services has a fleet of moving vans depicting the pristine scenery, unique sights, magnificent wildlife and honoring the native peoples of Alaska and their customs.  When pulling up to the residence of a soon-to-be new resident of Alaska, their first experience of moving to Alaska is one of awe of the expansive depictions on the moving vans that represents a taste of what they will experience in their new home in Alaska.

    On the other hand, for those that move from Alaska, it may be that last image of Alaska that departs their new-found home somewhere to the Lower 48 states.  Chances are they may bid  a fond farewell to a beautiful part of this world that they have now officially departed.

    Perhaps there are those reading this who may be considering a move to Alaska.  Or maybe some are thinking it’s time to think about a move back to the Lower 48.  If so, check out what Hi-Line Moving Services can do for you when looking for an Alaska moving company at www.hilinemoving.com.


  5. Alaska and Around the World for 37 Years!

    March 26, 2012 by Brian Smith

    Since 1975, Paul Lindstrom, President of Hi-Line Moving Services, has been involved with people moving to Alaska and throughout the world .  Paul began his career in accounting back then for Great Falls North American which later became a part of Hi-Line Moving Services not long after he purchased Hi-Line Transfer & Storage.  Soon thereafter, it became Hi-Line Moving Services. 1987 marked the beginning of what has become a large internationally recognized independent van line company serving individuals and the US military all over the world and not just Montana.

    The area of the company for which Paul has the greatest passion has been the division that services those that wish to move to Alaska or move from Alaska.  Hi-Line Moving Services has become a major player as an Alaska moving company.  He has enjoyed this challenge a great deal along with the other everyday challenges in the moving business.  To quote, “Each day brings new challenges.  At the end of the day, you wonder at how fast the day went by.”

    Other notable moments in his 37-year journey has been moving David Letterman to his ranch in a remote part of Montana.  However, he says the accomplishment of which he is most proud is “staying in business all these years…. and being able to provide employment to others in the community.”  So whether moving to Alaska or anywhere else on this big planet, we’ve got the right moves!


  6. An Important Key to a Successful Move

    November 4, 2011 by Brian Smith

    Moving to Alaska or moving to Zanzibar and all other points A to Z can have a good deal in common when it comes to preparation for the move and the quality of the moving service you secure as you move your life from one place to another.  It’s all about minimizing your risk.  Undoubtedly, as you have either been through many relocations in your life or if this is a completely new experience, the fundamentals of a good, professional experience do not change.  Here are the things you need to be watching for remembering all the while from the beginning of this transition to the very end, proper preparation is absolutely key.

    In this article, we will address proper packing of your belongings into boxes.  Whether you do this yourself or hire your moving service to do this, good packing practices will assure trouble-free delivery.  Boxes, which are the size of a box of copier paper, are considered to be small boxes.  Anything smaller than that should be packed into a larger box which will provide better protection because it will load on to the moving van more effectively.  Very small boxes, for the most part, offer little protection and create a goodly amount of unnecessary handling.  Larger boxes offer more strength and stability in the load and can withstand more stress.  This helps to eliminate crushing and minimizes shifting as it travels down the road.

    It may seem natural or acceptable, when packing fragile items such as dishes, to lay them flat in a box as you would when setting them in a kitchen cupboard.  On the contrary, wrapping each individual item in 2 or 3 sheets of unprinted newsprint paper and setting them on edge is standard practice.  A plate on its edge will take a lot more stress than laying it flat.  The extra paper acts as a cushion between pieces especially as you pack more pieces in an extra-sturdy box called a dish pack (sometimes referred to as dish barrels).  Packing the dish pack so that each piece is snugly in place will prevent pieces from knocking against each other.  The walls of a dish pack are extra thick (triple-wall construction) and offer great protection from external forces and are well worth the extra investment over standard boxes.

    Other standard box sizes are the medium box – about the same size of 2 small boxes as described earlier, large boxes – about the size of 3 small boxes, and extra-large boxes that are the size of 4 small boxes or an artificial Christmas tree box.  The main factors for determining which box to use depends a lot on the bulk of the items to be packed and how much the items weigh.  It is important that the boxes are not too heavy so that you can handle them when fully packed.  Also, you don’t want the box to “blow-out” from excessive weight when handling the box.  Blown-out boxes are typically caused by books.  Small boxes are called book boxes for a reason.

    Crushed boxes come in all sizes and are caused most often by not properly filling a box.  If you have a box that still has a void at the top, use linens, towels, clothing, or even wadded up paper to fill it.  Keep in mind that someone that picks up the box for loading is assuming the box is full and is making a judgment of where to load the box depending on its contents and how hefty it feels.

    “What about unusually shaped items…” you might ask.  There is nothing to prevent you from modifying a couple of boxes and constructing a box by taping them together.  A good moving company will always be available to make suggestions when such cases arise.

    So what about crates, you may ask, particularly with regard to shipments moving to Alaska, which happens to be a specialized service which we offer.  It is commonplace for some moving companies to load shipments into large crates called lift vans for Alaska shipping.  We are able to provide that service because we will do whatever the customer desires.  We do maintain, however, that using lift vans only increases the handling of each item and can influence a strong sense of security when handling it during loading on or unloading off the transport vehicle; after all it’s all in a crate, right?  Lift vans can weigh in excess of 1000 pounds and when swinging that much weight around on a forklift or setting it down on the dock or on the deck of a truck or ship, it ALWAYS requires a gentle touch.  When you know your shipment is being placed into storage for a period of time before being delivered to the final destination, lift vans certainly are worth considering but there is little to no cost advantage.  This largely boils down to a personal preference in many cases, especially when moving to Alaska.  You have the option ship your belongings, as we provide, over-the-road as opposed to over water in a ship or barge.  When shipping must be done over water to places like Hawaii or to other countries, containers or lift vans are unavoidable.  When moving to Alaska, you do have options to consider.

    Hi-Line Moving Services has been shipping household goods moving to Anchorage or moving to Fairbanks and many other points throughout Alaska for about 15 years now.  We have come to know this area extremely well and moving your household goods over the ALCAN highway offers many advantages over other forms of shipping to Alaska.  The greatest advantage is a very competitive price tag.  We invite you to check us out.


  7. Tips on Planning a Move to Alaska or a Move from Alaska

    September 27, 2011 by Brian Smith

    alaska-move-moving-alcan-highwayWhen planning a move from Alaska or to Alaska, there are many things to keep in mind. While packing, selecting the right moving company, and figuring out how to ship your items are all standard elements of any move, there is a little bit more effort required to make your move from Alaska to the lower 48 or vice versa successful. In this guide, we will provide you with tips on planning this move and what you can do to ensure that your trip goes smoothly.

    Time Management

    One of the biggest ways to be successful in planning any sort of move is the utilization of effective time management. You need to give yourself time to choose a new property in Alaska or in the new community you plan to move to, but you also need time to make a budget of all the expenses that will be involved in your move. Sit down and calculate the cost of gas on the way to and from your destination, how much the moving and shipping costs are, and a variety of other elements. Since you are traveling mostly on the highway, there shouldn’t be too many shipping costs to contend with unless you are moving into or out of a community that is not vehicle accessible.

    Pack Early

    Ideally, it may be a wise idea to start packing anywhere from a month to two weeks before you scheduled move date. This way, you can be certain that all your boxes are packed, and if you forgot to pack something, you won’t be scrambling at the last minute to find a box to put it in. Obviously, leave out the bare essentials until the very end, and make sure that if you pack your valuables, you instruct your moving company on how to handle that box, or just move those across yourself.

    Enlist A Moving Company

    You may need to get help from a moving company while you are making move from Alaska or to it. No matter what you are trying to do, Hi-Line Moving Services may be able to help you. They specialize in helping people move away from the Alaska area down to the lower 48 or from the lower states up to Alaska. No matter which of these you are trying to do, you will find that the moving company’s employees are more than eager to help you make your move smoothly.

    Traveling

    When traveling on the highway, you need to be aware of the traffic conditions, so it is a good idea to research as much about the traffic to and from Alaska ahead of time. Also, plan for making a few bathroom or food stops along the way as necessary. These can add time to your trip, so it is a good idea to plan ahead in this instance too. Always be prepared for the unexpected so you don’t get too delayed.

    Hopefully these Move from Alaska or move to Alaska tips help your move succeed.

    (photo credit: John Lillis)


  8. Alaskan Moving Checklist: Relocating to Alaska

    September 13, 2011 by Brian Smith

    moving-alaskaWhether you are trying to make a move from Alaska to the lower 48 or the other way around, there is a specific checklist that you should follow when packing. In turn, there are a few moving services to consider that will help make the move run more smoothly. In this guide, we will explore the items you should bring with you and how the moving services can help make your move to Alaska or to it a more pleasurable experience.

    Of course, you are most likely going to be moving along the highway, taking a truck, and for this reason, you should consider moving with Hi-Line Moving Services. They help people all across the United States make their move from Alaska to the lower 48 and vice versa.  Some communities cannot be reached by highway access, so you may need to ship some of your goods first to a place that you can get to by highway, like Fairbanks or Anchorage.  Then the movers can get your goods on the road again and headed to your destination.

    Here is a checklist of some of the items to bring with you as you make your move into Alaska or out of it:

    Valuable Items- You definitely want to make sure to bring your items of value with you. This includes your wallet, cell phone, any credit or debit cards you may have, professional certificates, computers and electronics, etc. You can bring these over yourself or have the movers ship them over.

    Car- Getting your car shipped over to Alaska or from Alaska is one of the smartest things you can do. Moving costs money, and if you want to save a little extra money when you get to your new home, you should continue to drive the car you already have.

    Animals- If you have any animals as pets, don’t leave them behind! If you can bring your dogs or cats with you, that is great. If you have larger animals, you may need to make accommodations for them ahead of time.

    Bare Necessities- Of course, you will also need money, clothes, and food when you move, so bring enough of these essential items with you so that you don’t need to buy more as you make your move, or even afterwards.

    When deciding to move from Alaska to the lower 48 or from the lower states to Alaska, you need to have a good plan in mind for how you are going to move your goods. Obviously, highway travel is the best option, but you can only go so far on the road. Make sure you know where to ship the goods that cannot be transported on the highway, and go with reliable movers, like Hi-Line Moving Services. They won’t steer you wrong. Bring along the most essential items when you move, and make sure you notify the movers about what sort of items are being moved. This way, you run less of a risk of loss or theft.

    (photo credit: Travis S.)


  9. Three Important Home Relocation Tips for the Entire Family

    August 30, 2011 by Brian Smith

    Packing and MovingPreparing to relocate to a new town brings about a mix of emotions. You may feel excited about the new adventure awaiting you and your family in your new location or ready to take on the challenges of a new job. But relocation also comes with stress for the whole family. Change, even change for the better, takes a toll on everyone. Use these top three relocation tips to make your move to a new city smoother and as stress free as possible.

    1. Say Goodbye

    When you get ready to pick up roots and relocate to a new town, make sure you honor the life you have built in your current home. Give everyone in the family time to say goodbye to the people and places they have come to love. Taking day trips to parks, natural areas or the local pool to enjoy the spot for one last time allows you and especially your children to leave with recent fond memories of a favorite place. Make plans to have special meals at restaurants you frequent or buy a favorite local treat. You may even want to consider throwing a party. This gives both mom and dad and the kids time to spend with friends and marks a moment in time when everyone was able to say goodbye.

    2. Give Yourself a Break

    As you go about the time consuming and stressful process of packing, moving and transferring your life to a new place, make sure to give yourself a break. This means stepping away from the duties of relocating to take the kids to the park or to treat yourself to your favorite latte every now and then. Your to-do list will still be there when you get back from an hour on the playground and both you and the kids will be refreshed from the time away. Also consider making a long term to-do list and then schedule just a handful of tasks each day. If you finish early, don’t move on to the next task, take a break and relax.

    3. Ask for Help

    People embarking on a move often hear  they should ask for help. And it’s one of the hardest relocation tips to follow. But asking for help will greatly ease your stress. Asking friends and family members lets them feel as though they’re contributing and could mean some extra quality time before you leave. You should also consider talking with relocation professionals who have a proven track record of relocating families, especially if you are moving a considerable distance. You don’t have to reinvent the wheel during your relocation. A moving company specializing in relocations can probably save you time, money and stress because they have done it all before.

    Relocating is never easy even when the reason behind the relocation is positive. Use these relocation tips to make your move easier on the whole family.

    (photo credit: Chris Enns)


  10. The Graying of America: Moving into Retirement Options

    August 2, 2011 by Brian Smith

    Very recently our attention has been drawn to the elder members of society who are finding unique retirement options which have become much more diverse in the fairly recent past.  One of those options is known as a Continuous Care Retirement Community, or CCRC.  The premise for such communities is to have well-planned access to amenities that concur with the lifestyle preferences of older Americans.  A significant portion of those amenities incorporate a transitioning flow of healthcare options and facilities that adjust with the needs of the members of such communities as they age and their needs change accordingly.  A common comment from those seeking out these communities is “We just don’t want to be a burden on our children as we grow older.”

    What is most enlightening about these developing communities is the detailed attention to seniors and the common affects to every aging member of society that are beginning to emerge.  Early in life, typically we exert great efforts in education and preparation to become professional, self-sustaining and self-reliant members of our communities.  Now encouragement for those same kinds of efforts is being brought to our awareness in preparing for the latter years of life.  Awareness is key so that options for preparation can be sought out and implemented well in advance of potential difficulties.  That preparation essentially eliminates the fears of what to do when life takes these turns and twists.  There many professionals who have made concentrated efforts to really identify the options in great detail so that well-informed choices can be made well in advance so that proper and seamless preparations can be made.

    So often, seniors are hit with life changing events that they know are coming but really do not prepare for them mostly because, as the adage goes, they don’t know what they don’t know.  It’s no wonder that they don’t know the questions to ask.  So where does one learn the questions?  What resources are available that can help senior citizens set the direction could consider?

    On a local level, many communities have public organizations oftentimes referred to as Aging Services, Senior Community Centers, Elder Services Programs to name a few.  National associations have been organized to set ethical and reliability standards to which legitimate service providers can attach themselves.  Well founded professionals are engaged in this dedicated effort.  They want to assure senior citizens they will not fall prey to scam artists that are intent on bilking them of their carefully prepared savings for life’s latter years.  One such organization is called the National Association of Senior Move Managers; NASMM for short.  They are easily found on the internet and are a tremendous resource that can help find the right questions to ask or consider.  Another more generalized association is the National Association of Personal Organizers (NAPO).  These professionals are more diverse in the services they offer.  They are particularly useful for those whose lives are so busy in their professions that they require assistance in handling the personal details of their lives thereby reducing significant stress and bolstering their confidence in timely execution of important details, events, objectives, etc.

    CCRC’s have recognized just how valuable these professionals are and endeavor to align themselves with these professionals when establishing these community developments and working with their prospective clients.  For those of us in the moving industry, there is emerging a great need for these kinds of services.  The question now is whether senior citizens in our communities actually want to acquire the services of these professionals.  We are taking a good, hard look at what these professionals can offer and how to integrate these kinds of services into moving.  One of the saddest things we see fairly often is when a spouse dies and the surviving spouse is left with a whole house full of memories that have been acquired over a lifetime and the assumption is that the surviving spouse can pick it all up and take it with them when the move in with children or, at least, into a residence near family.  That can be a very painful reality when suddenly faced with the prospect of having to downsize and having to leave many of those memories behind.  This is a major transition in life that when properly approached and addressed, can be a greatly relaxed, albeit difficult experience.